EXPORT CITATION

Chapter-13 Professionally Managing the Boundaries between Medicine and Religion: Historical Perspectives

BOOK TITLE: Science and Religion-Synergy not Skepticism

Author
1. McCullough Laurence B
2. Chervenak Frank A
ISBN
9789352702756
DOI
10.5005/jp/books/18046_14
Edition
1/e
Publishing Year
2018
Pages
7
Author Affiliations
1. Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA, Baylor College of Medicine, Center for Ethics, Medicine and Public Issues, Houston, Texas, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA, Lenox Hill Hospital, Zucker School of Medicine, Hofstra/Northwell, New York, USA
2. New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, Fellow of World Academy of Art and Science, New York, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA, E-mail: fac2001@med.cornell.edu, The New York Hospital - Cornell Medical Center , New York, Joan and Sanford I Weill Medical College of Cornell University, The New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 525 E. 68th Street, J-130, New York, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University; New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University/New York, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell, University, New York, New York, USA, Lenox Hill Hospital, Zucker School of Medicine, Hofstra/ Northwell, New York, USA
Chapter keywords
Medicine, religion, historical perspective, fraught historical boundary, secular profession, professional integrity, vulnerability

Abstract

Historically, the boundary between science and medicine, on the one hand, and religion, on the other, has often been fraught. The pertinent point of this adage is that the study of science will make one an atheist. Because the study of science is required to become a physician, becoming a physician will make one an atheist. Ubi tres medici, ibi duo atheii may also be a warning to people of faith to stay away from doctors. This chapter explores this fraught historical boundary and sets out the professional management of it described in the medical ethics of Dr John Gregory (1724–1773), who wrote the first modern medical ethics. Gregory’s account of medicine as a secular profession teaches us that there is no necessary conflict between Baconian, scientific medicine, on the hand, and communities and traditions of faith, on the other. Moreover, creating such conflict in patient care is professionally irresponsible because doing so would violate the professional virtue of compassion.

Related Books

© 2019 Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.   |   All Rights Reserved

Powered by MPS ScholarStor