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Chapter-03 Religion and Science in Medicine: Conflict or Synergy

BOOK TITLE: Science and Religion-Synergy not Skepticism

Author
1. McCullough Laurence B
2. Chervenak Frank A
ISBN
9789352702756
DOI
10.5005/jp/books/18046_4
Edition
1/e
Publishing Year
2018
Pages
5
Author Affiliations
1. Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA, Baylor College of Medicine, Center for Ethics, Medicine and Public Issues, Houston, Texas, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York, USA, Lenox Hill Hospital, Zucker School of Medicine, Hofstra/Northwell, New York, USA
2. New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, Fellow of World Academy of Art and Science, New York, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA, E-mail: fac2001@med.cornell.edu, The New York Hospital - Cornell Medical Center , New York, Joan and Sanford I Weill Medical College of Cornell University, The New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 525 E. 68th Street, J-130, New York, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University; New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell University/New York, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA, Weill Medical College of Cornell, University, New York, New York, USA, Lenox Hill Hospital, Zucker School of Medicine, Hofstra/ Northwell, New York, USA
Chapter keywords
Religion, science, perinatal medicine, ill-fated pursuit, antidote, virtue, humility, human reproduction

Abstract

This chapter describes conflict or synergy of religion and science in medicine. There is a profound and longstanding synergy between medicine and religion regarding the ill-fated pursuit of perfection in medicine and the central role of the professional virtue of humility as the corrective. This chapter covers the ill-fated pursuit of perfection and the antidotes to the pursuit of perfection: the professional virtue of humility and preventive ethics. Virtues are traits or habits of character that turn our focus away from self-interest to the protection and promotion of the interests of others. The professional virtue of humility supports a preventive ethics approach to achieving this goal. Early in pregnancy or ideally preconception, physicians should anticipate the potential for conflict originating in a woman’s clinically unrealistic (usually because uninformed) expectations for the perfect baby.

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