Singleton and Twin Fetal Movements before 20 Weeks of Gestation

JOURNAL TITLE: Donald School Journal of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Author
1. Junko Noguchi
2. Genzo Marumo
ISSN
0973-614X
DOI
10.5005/jp-journals-10009-1558
Volume
12
Issue
2
Publishing Year
2018
Pages
5
Author Affiliations
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Itabashi Chuo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan
    1. Department of Nursing, Kagawa Prefectural College of Health Sciences, Kagawa, Japan
  • Article keywords
    Fetal movement, First half of pregnancy, Fourdimensional ultrasound, Singleton pregnancy, Twin pregnancy

    Abstract

    Objective:To assess the change in the frequency of singleton and twin fetal movements with advancing gestation and compare the total number of fetal movements among singleton, active, and quiet twin fetuses at 12 to 19 weeks of gestation using four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound. Materials and methods: The 4D ultrasound was used to examine fetal movements in 58 singleton and 48 normal twin fetuses at 12 to 19 weeks of gestation. The frequencies of eight fetal movements were assessed through 15-minute recordings. The correlation between the frequency of each fetal movement in singleton and twin fetuses and gestational age was analyzed. The total number of fetal movements among singleton, active, and quiet twin fetuses was compared at 12 to 13 and 14 to 19 weeks respectively. Results: Frequencies of hand-to-face and leg movements were significantly increased with advancing gestation, whereas the frequencies of general movements significantly decreased at 12 to 19 weeks in singleton fetuses. Frequencies of body rotation and general movements were significantly decreased with advancing gestation, whereas the frequencies of mouthing movement significantly increased at 12 to 19 weeks in twin fetuses. The total number of fetal movements in singleton fetuses was significantly higher than that in quiet twins at 12 to 13 weeks of gestation, and there were significant differences in the total number of fetal movements between singleton fetuses and active or quiet twins at 14 to 19 weeks. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the characteristics of fetal movements in singleton and twin fetuses are different before 20 weeks of gestation. However, the data and their interpretation in the present study should be taken with some degree of caution because of the small number of subjects studied. Further studies involving a larger sample size are needed to draw the hard conclusions regarding the difference in fetal movements between singleton and twin pregnancies before 20 weeks’ gestation.

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